Circulating Avian Influenza Viruses Closely Related to the 1918 Virus Have Pandemic Potential

Circulating Avian Influenza Viruses Closely Related to the 1918 Virus Have Pandemic Potential

The latest in dual-use gain of function research, Yoshihiro Kawaoka and his team seem to be intent on one-upping Ron Fouchier when it comes to spurious research. This time, the group used reverse genetics to cobble together a “1918-flu like virus, composed of avian influenza virus segments.” The new virus demonstrates higher pathogenicity in ferrets than the case-fatality rate of the original 1918 flu virus. For reference, the 1918 pandemic killed 50 million people.

The summary of the article:

  • Current circulating avian flu viruses encode proteins similar to the 1918 virus
  • A 1918-like virus composed of avian influenza virus segments was generated
  • The 1918-like virus is more pathogenic in mammals than an authentic avian flu virus
  • Seven amino acid substitutions were sufficient to confer transmission in ferrets.

In a commentary in the Guardian, the same types of justifications were rolled out by Kawaoka: awareness, medical countermeasures, and surveillance. Still lacking an argument as to why gain-of-function really promotes these, over other (less dangerous) research if at all.

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3 thoughts on “Circulating Avian Influenza Viruses Closely Related to the 1918 Virus Have Pandemic Potential

  1. Pingback: Bad Bioethics Headline: 1918-like flu edition | The Broken Spoke

  2. Pingback: What am I reading? 15 June 2014 | The Broken Spoke

  3. Pingback: Ziploc: There’s No Better Way to Protect Your Select Agent Investment | Life as an Extreme Sport

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